Tag Archives: The Salvation Army

Sumo Wrestling

I remember the first time I saw a real sumo wrestler – well, not in person, but we watched sumo wrestling in high school in a gym class.  All I could think of was, I hope those diapers stay up!  Big men – extremely heavy – banging around trying to push each other off the mat.

This past week the IT department took two days to do some education and team building.  They had Kevin Metcalf come to do sessions on SA history and mission.  I was only in for one session but it was excellent as you would expect.

After the education session was some fun and team-building.  People seemed to be reluctant to participate so I jumped in (that’s what happens when you are an extrovert).

Then the fun began.  It was a great effort just to put the outfit on and off, but worth every minute!  The group had great fun.

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Amazing evening

Every once in a while, we get to have an experience that has nothing to do with Fred and Wendy and everything to do with the reputation and work of The Salvation Army. This past week was one of those experiences.

We enjoyed a most remarkable dinner at O’Brien house on Meech Lake, QC. This historic home which has been restored fully was the site of our NAB dinner and our guest was the USA Ambassador to Canada.  Ambassador Croft was gracious and has a rather intimate understanding of TSA. She spoke well and delightfully of The Army, our work and her experience with us.

The setting, the meal and the guest made it a most remarkable evening.

 

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A time of blessing

Before I became a Salvation Army Officer I was going to be a professional photographer. So in some regard, I should be embarrassed by the quality of this shot! So many things wrong with it, from focus to composure to balance…. oh my. But here it is.

I include it because in my last post I said I would tell some of the wonderful stories of ministry.  And quite honestly there are more of these moments and the tough ones. The difference is, the comments intending to hurt seem to be like velcro! They stick so much better than the positive comments.

This was from our first aboriginal round table which we did at The Salvation Army’s camp in northern BC. It was a wonderful combination of cultures and a great reminder to me, and to the those in attendance, that while the indigenous community might be different, it is by no means inferior – and in fact I suspect in many ways it is superior.

Those of us who come from the history of conquering and colonizing need to get to a point of confession, that while we might personally have hurt or stolen land, we are the heirs to this type of behaviour. We possess that which was given wrongly. Time and economics might not be able to restore all, but our confession to this and our admission of that history are important.

This photo, therefore, represents one of those “best moments” of ministry as we found ourselves in partnership with some truly remarkable people. I will look back upon this poorly taken picture with a heart of gratitude for this ministry opportunity.

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